Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Only for the discussion of the Minelab Equinox series of metal detector within this forum.
Post Reply
Junior
Posts: 1306
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2015 5:53 pm
Has thanked: 400 times
Been thanked: 389 times

Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Junior »

Saw these on a rally and avaible from certain auction site and prob else where .

Looks like avaible for 3030 also ....

Minelab Equinox 800 - 600 - 15'' Coil Yoke Stiffener and Repair - RED also avaible on other pages ones for smaller coils

Info ....
2 In 1 - Stiffener and Repair Yoke - RED

Minelab Equinox 800 - 600 Coil Yoke Stiffener and Repair Yoke

The NOX 600 and 800 coil yoke stiffeners will make your coils less prone to breaking by reinforcing the existing yoke plates. There are to versions available one for the 11- and 15-inch coil and one for the 6-inch coil.

Also available is the repair yoke for the 11- and 15-inch coil. If your yoke tab breaks off, you can use this part to repair the coil using two cable ties to hold the yoke plate in position securely.

This is for anyone who has a broken yoke already and uses 2 cable ties to fix the repair plate in place. To fit simple, disassemble the coil from the steam and put the repair plate in place, and secure around the coil body with 2 off x 5 mm cable ties. Reassemble the coil back onto the shaft placing the broken yoke tab in place to get the right spacing.



Moruglah
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2020 2:20 pm
Has thanked: 17 times
Been thanked: 64 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Moruglah »

A lad who I know bought a 800 and bragged and bragged about how good it was.
Until while at a dig his coil ears fell off. And yes we laughed at him (only for 5 hours)
It was surprising to see how thin the ears are even on the 15” coil.
SIMPLEX +

User avatar
fred
Posts: 11842
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Location: Kent
Has thanked: 3250 times
Been thanked: 7452 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by fred »

Moruglah wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:06 am
A lad who I know bought a 800 and bragged and bragged about how good it was.
Until while at a dig his coil ears fell off. And yes we laughed at him (only for 5 hours)
It was surprising to see how thin the ears are even on the 15” coil.

Within limits the thickness of the lug is irrelevant. What is important is choosing a plastic with the right properties and then good quality control while the coils are being made. Because most coils are OK I rather suspect that it is the latter. That probably also helps explains why only a relatively small number fail (although it's still damn annoying if yours is one of them).

Another possibility, which I have no way of proving, is the thickness of the tear washers that Minelab provide. I have noticed that either during manufacture or use some of them flatten enough to cause the lugs to touch the plastic on the stem and start rubbing a groove in it. Some people now pack out the tear washer with a thin piece of acetate or similar to avoid this.

Over the years many machines have suffered from design faults. The original Explorers had stem lock failures and anothe popular brand had magnet failures which caused detectorists to leave their control pads scattered over the fields like confetti. What possibly matters more is how well the company deals with any problems that do arise.

Finally there is also probably an element of misuse in some cases. Regardless of the brand of detector, I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground. :D
Equinox 800 x2

Scoob
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Aug 10, 2019 9:47 am
Location: St mary's bay
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 6 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Scoob »

If you look at the spacing of the ears when the coil's on the machine they bend inwards when tightened up. Like lots of detectorists I'm guilty of using detectors as leaning sticks. That's probably why mine broke.

The saddle is great. I epoxied it on which enabled me then to glue the ears back on to the breaks and also to the saddle which makes it unlikely I will have any more breakages.

A well recommended purchase!

User avatar
fred
Posts: 11842
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Location: Kent
Has thanked: 3250 times
Been thanked: 7452 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by fred »

Scoob wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:26 pm
If you look at the spacing of the ears when the coil's on the machine they bend inwards when tightened up. Like lots of detectorists I'm guilty of using detectors as leaning sticks. That's probably why mine broke.

The saddle is great. I epoxied it on which enabled me then to glue the ears back on to the breaks and also to the saddle which makes it unlikely I will have any more breakages.

A well recommended purchase!

Thanks Scoob. I am convinced and will try one.
Equinox 800 x2

User avatar
Mancave-man
Posts: 1383
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:40 pm
Has thanked: 862 times
Been thanked: 767 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Mancave-man »

As I said in a previous post, I fitted one a couple of months ago without any issues to date. Would recommend one to all Equinox users. ::g ::g

User avatar
Bargeman
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2017 12:25 pm
Location: Newbury
Has thanked: 1164 times
Been thanked: 1843 times
Contact:

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Bargeman »

Mancave-man wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:50 pm
As I said in a previous post, I fitted one a couple of months ago without any issues to date. Would recommend one to all Equinox users. ::g ::g

Why? mine is now over two years old and has not had a problem, so why would I buy and fit something that really is not necessary ?




BM [:)

Equinox 800
Rutus Alter 71

holloway
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2016 12:15 pm
Has thanked: 6 times
Been thanked: 20 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by holloway »

i have had and broken two Equinox coils ,so on the third i used the yoke(stiffner) from the start just seems like common sense to me a very good well thought out product i dont anticipate any more problems.

User avatar
Mancave-man
Posts: 1383
Joined: Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:40 pm
Has thanked: 862 times
Been thanked: 767 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Mancave-man »

Bargeman wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 1:37 pm
Mancave-man wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:50 pm
As I said in a previous post, I fitted one a couple of months ago without any issues to date. Would recommend one to all Equinox users. ::g ::g

Why? mine is now over two years old and has not had a problem, so why would I buy and fit something that really is not necessary ?




BM [:)
Well, it's all about anticipation and not having the worry of one breaking for such a little outlay. It's just personal choice. I chose to have one you choose not to. It's not a problem.

Dave Lowe
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:34 am
Location: Kent
Has thanked: 211 times
Been thanked: 88 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Dave Lowe »

I have just purchased a Nox, this is the coil on my old detector I dont know why they cant make them like this, with ribs for strength, the lugs are the same thickness.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

nalag46
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2018 11:20 am
Been thanked: 18 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by nalag46 »

Within limits the thickness of the lug is irrelevant. What is important is choosing a plastic with the right properties and then good quality control while the coils are being made. Because most coils are OK I rather suspect that it is the latter. That probably also helps explains why only a relatively small number fail (although it's still damn annoying if yours is one of them).

Another possibility, which I have no way of proving, is the thickness of the tear washers that Minelab provide. I have noticed that either during manufacture or use some of them flatten enough to cause the lugs to touch the plastic on the stem and start rubbing a groove in it. Some people now pack out the tear washer with a thin piece of acetate or similar to avoid this.

Over the years many machines have suffered from design faults. The original Explorers had stem lock failures and anothe popular brand had magnet failures which caused detectorists to leave their control pads scattered over the fields like confetti. What possibly matters more is how well the company deals with any problems that do arise.

Finally there is also probably an element of misuse in some cases. Regardless of the brand of detector, I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground.


I am sorry Fred but I can only agree partially with your comments. I have had two coils replaced already in the space of less than one year with the lugs virtually wrenched off clear of the base and I know of at least 10 other individuals from up and down the country who have had the same problem, so it isnt just a few cases. I, a seasoned detectorist and ex-metal detector dealer of some 47 years and counting, have seen my fair share of good, mediocre and bad manufacturing of parts across all brands and having had the privilege of been able to use virtually every main make and model of machine that ever was available, I can tell you that this is not a new problem with the Minelab detectors. A few years back, while I was still running my shop, the X-Terra model was introduced and out of the first dozen units I sold, 4 came back with broken lugs and the problem was just as it is now, poor quality of the plastic used which is far too thin and too britle for the heavy work the coils undertake. And yes, on the Nox the tear washers are part to blame because they do not cushion the stem solidly as they should but at the end of the day, it is a poor job from a leading manufacturer.
It is easy to blame the way people use their machines and again, many can be held responsible for heavy scuffing and partial leaning but those could never be associated with my normal detecting ways, of simple and slow swing, head 1" above ground and would not dream of resting the head on the ground and use the frame to propel me up after retrieving, I can still manage pretty well to recover items without getting on my knees. There is also the issue of overtighting the nuts and again, I know from past experiences on many other detectors that doing so it will eventually lead to trouble, so in my last breakage, I simply wanted to give the coil a good clean over, undid the bolts and everything seemed ok until I pulled the shaft out and one of the lugs dropped to the floor. I spoke to the supplier and they said they had had a few come in with the same problem and they would be replaced under warranty with no questions asked, so they do know there is a problem so Minelab must do better.

Ten pence!
Posts: 1370
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2013 10:42 pm
Location: Norfolk
Has thanked: 512 times
Been thanked: 513 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Ten pence! »

The electronics on the Equinox are great, the metal and plastic bits that completes the package is junk, in fact machines costing a fraction of the price are more robust. I did a lot of reading up before I purchased mine about a year and a half ago, from the off I realised I'd have to treat it with kid gloves, first thing to break, six months in, was the armrest, a bit just dropped off in use! No problem, a stainless screw and gorilla glue sorted that.

Next up was the badly fitting upper camlock, there was to much clearance between the spigot and socket and from day one it creaked, a bit of plastic shim was put in to take up the slack and wobble but it still worked loose again, I never collapse the machine so three pop rivets made the joint a fixed one.

And finally (?) a month ago a new creak started, it happened on maize stubble, yup the dreaded cracked coil lug problem, there was a hairline crack running all the way along the bottom of the right hand coil lug where it meets the coil itself, when I got home I ordered the bit in the picture below from the on line auction site, it is 3D printed from probably nylon or polythene, needless to say it is strong and you cannot bend it with fingers alone, it is also slightly flexible and fits the coil via cable ties, it works superbly.
DSC00814 (1).JPG
Hopefully someone from Minelab will see this and the other posts and make some improvements, in my view it is unacceptable to have a top end machine with the build quality of a Chicom Friday afternoon special......
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
fred
Posts: 11842
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Location: Kent
Has thanked: 3250 times
Been thanked: 7452 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by fred »

nalag46 wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 6:08 pm
Within limits the thickness of the lug is irrelevant. What is important is choosing a plastic with the right properties and then good quality control while the coils are being made. Because most coils are OK I rather suspect that it is the latter. That probably also helps explains why only a relatively small number fail (although it's still damn annoying if yours is one of them).

Another possibility, which I have no way of proving, is the thickness of the tear washers that Minelab provide. I have noticed that either during manufacture or use some of them flatten enough to cause the lugs to touch the plastic on the stem and start rubbing a groove in it. Some people now pack out the tear washer with a thin piece of acetate or similar to avoid this.

Over the years many machines have suffered from design faults. The original Explorers had stem lock failures and anothe popular brand had magnet failures which caused detectorists to leave their control pads scattered over the fields like confetti. What possibly matters more is how well the company deals with any problems that do arise.

Finally there is also probably an element of misuse in some cases. Regardless of the brand of detector, I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground.


I am sorry Fred but I can only agree partially with your comments. I have had two coils replaced already in the space of less than one year with the lugs virtually wrenched off clear of the base and I know of at least 10 other individuals from up and down the country who have had the same problem, so it isnt just a few cases. I, a seasoned detectorist and ex-metal detector dealer of some 47 years and counting, have seen my fair share of good, mediocre and bad manufacturing of parts across all brands and having had the privilege of been able to use virtually every main make and model of machine that ever was available, I can tell you that this is not a new problem with the Minelab detectors. A few years back, while I was still running my shop, the X-Terra model was introduced and out of the first dozen units I sold, 4 came back with broken lugs and the problem was just as it is now, poor quality of the plastic used which is far too thin and too britle for the heavy work the coils undertake. And yes, on the Nox the tear washers are part to blame because they do not cushion the stem solidly as they should but at the end of the day, it is a poor job from a leading manufacturer.
It is easy to blame the way people use their machines and again, many can be held responsible for heavy scuffing and partial leaning but those could never be associated with my normal detecting ways, of simple and slow swing, head 1" above ground and would not dream of resting the head on the ground and use the frame to propel me up after retrieving, I can still manage pretty well to recover items without getting on my knees. There is also the issue of overtighting the nuts and again, I know from past experiences on many other detectors that doing so it will eventually lead to trouble, so in my last breakage, I simply wanted to give the coil a good clean over, undid the bolts and everything seemed ok until I pulled the shaft out and one of the lugs dropped to the floor. I spoke to the supplier and they said they had had a few come in with the same problem and they would be replaced under warranty with no questions asked, so they do know there is a problem so Minelab must do better.

Partial agreement will do fine. :D

Considering that many tens of thousand of units have been sold in the UK alone I suspect that the vast majority still do not have problems, not yet anyway. I was really only speculating about why that might be so.

My first article on the Nox contained a suspicion that the lugs weren't robust enough, however, my own experience is that the lug that I broke on a stock coil wasn't the same break as everybody else. A segment of the lug fell out. Given the treatment and the amount of use that mine get I am not really complaining because I am using a hobby detector almost as a professional tool.
coillug.JPG
Funnily enough we have been detecting almost exactly the same amount of time. I started in 1971. Upon reflection I still reckon that, with or without manufacturing faults, I'll take the Nox over my old BFO any day. Wish the fields and beaches were still as good though. ::g
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Equinox 800 x2

nalag46
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2018 11:20 am
Been thanked: 18 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by nalag46 »

From Fred

Partial agreement will do fine.

Considering that many tens of thousand of units have been sold in the UK alone I suspect that the vast majority still do not have problems, not yet anyway. I was really only speculating about why that might be so.

My first article on the Nox contained a suspicion that the lugs weren't robust enough, however, my own experience is that the lug that I broke on a stock coil wasn't the same break as everybody else. A segment of the lug fell out. Given the treatment and the amount of use that mine get I am not really complaining because I am using a hobby detector almost as a professional tool.

Funnily enough we have been detecting almost exactly the same amount of time. I started in 1971. Upon reflection I still reckon that, with or without manufacturing faults, I'll take the Nox over my old BFO any day. Wish the fields and beaches were still as good though.


It looks like we are from the same vintage? Apart from selling detectors I also, as an experienced electronic faultfinder, carried out repaired of most faults under and after warranty (in the days when the good old analogue electronic components were the norm? Parts you could actually SEE on the p.c.b. boards, test them and replace as needed. I loved that work) I also built a range of DIY metal detectors from the ubiquitous BFOs (consisting of a rod with a handle, an aluminium loop for the single coil housing and an AM wireless radio as the main control unit attached to the stem) that they did work and were fun to use. After that, I went onto more sophisticated VLF transmit/receive units with variable sensitivity and discrimination controls which took the hobby to a new dimension. These "upmarket" detectors of the day had a closed plastic dish housing two coils in not a very dissimilar manner to today's peers and they were the most difficult part to get right on those units, as the coils not only had to be firmly embedded inside the housing but also electronically matched to one another in order to obtain a clean output when affected by the presence of metal. The housings, although nothing in comparison to our modern injection technology, still had to be waterproof and fit for the purpose so I can boast I do know a thing or two about coils.
Today, in the throwaway society that we live in, you don't repair anything anymore so when something goes wrong you simply get it replaced specially where electronic equipment is concerned.
I agree with you entirely, you just could not go back to those good oldies however well we managed to do with them. I rate the Nox highly, I used it extensively and I can easily get the best out of it but I also like and use other top of the range machines that I like even better and as a totally unbiased user and regardless of what some may or may not agree, the Nox is good and better than many but it is not the all "bees knees" some make it out to be. The old question is still open today as it was then when people used to come to my shop and ask "what is the best metal detector on the market?" and the answer is that there is not and never has been such machine that is absolutely perfect for all grounds and conditions. My personal views.

User avatar
fred
Posts: 11842
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:15 pm
Location: Kent
Has thanked: 3250 times
Been thanked: 7452 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by fred »

I use the Nox on beaches as well as land and as far as I am concerned it is certainly the most versatile machine around at the moment. It is incredibly sensitive and actually goes far, far deeper than most people give it credit for, especially on beaches. Obviously it helps if you know how to use it properly and that really does takes time and experimentation.

It does have a few faults but, as I have stressed time and again, where the Nox really scores is that it is incredible fun to use. :D
Equinox 800 x2

User avatar
Bors
Posts: 1805
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:24 pm
Has thanked: 211 times
Been thanked: 1109 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Bors »

Quote nalag36,...."Within limits the thickness of the lug is irrelevant. What is important is choosing a plastic with the right properties and then good quality control while the coils are being made."

There are still many many vintage detectors still knocking around with original coils still on them today and their coil lugs are still sound, and we're talking 40 + odd year old detectors such as CScopes, Compass, and Arado`s etc etc. So whatever Minelab are producing is certainly not in the same quality bracket those vintage plastics were constructed like .I can`t remember any coil lugs breaking in those days , it just wasn`t an issue to my thinking back on it .
I have a very old Compass Coin Hustler I use on the Dunes & beach once every now & then and the coil lug on that is still sound as a pound to this day. (there's only one central lug ). ::g
Beware of the Man who shoots with only One gun.

Roger
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2018 7:39 pm
Location: Somerset
Has thanked: 64 times
Been thanked: 64 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Roger »

Whilst my 800s lugs have so far not broken after a lot of use over 18mths they are showing a lot of wear! I have a c scope TR 950 almost 40 years old that that puts the nox to shame with the quality of the plastic moulding! However the equinox is such a cracking machine in all other aspects I can over look it!

User avatar
Rivers rat
Posts: 503
Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 6:33 pm
Location: London(UK)
Has thanked: 182 times
Been thanked: 145 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Rivers rat »

fred wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:50 am
Moruglah wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:06 am
A lad who I know bought a 800 and bragged and bragged about how good it was.
Until while at a dig his coil ears fell off. And yes we laughed at him (only for 5 hours)
It was surprising to see how thin the ears are even on the 15” coil.

Within limits the thickness of the lug is irrelevant. What is important is choosing a plastic with the right properties and then good quality control while the coils are being made. Because most coils are OK I rather suspect that it is the latter. That probably also helps explains why only a relatively small number fail (although it's still damn annoying if yours is one of them).

Another possibility, which I have no way of proving, is the thickness of the tear washers that Minelab provide. I have noticed that either during manufacture or use some of them flatten enough to cause the lugs to touch the plastic on the stem and start rubbing a groove in it. Some people now pack out the tear washer with a thin piece of acetate or similar to avoid this.

Over the years many machines have suffered from design faults. The original Explorers had stem lock failures and anothe popular brand had magnet failures which caused detectorists to leave their control pads scattered over the fields like confetti. What possibly matters more is how well the company deals with any problems that do arise.

Finally there is also probably an element of misuse in some cases. Regardless of the brand of detector, I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground. :D



I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground. :D


:D :)) :D :)) :D :)) =)) :))

Thats fricking hilarious,

"Feeling the emptiness of the physical exhaustion" Ayn Rand


RR
Owner of a Foster PI one of the Enlightened few
Tools of the trade as of 2020: Lobos/Silver sabre/GMP/Deus/1266X/F75DST/Xterra 705/Nox800/Goldscan g5c/Goldbug pro

User avatar
Bors
Posts: 1805
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:24 pm
Has thanked: 211 times
Been thanked: 1109 times

Re: Coil lug repair/upgrade ad on for equinox 600/800

Post by Bors »

u;@ Quote Fred,..." I cringe everytime that I see some poor, knackered detectorist leaning on his machine as he levers his exhaused corpse up off of the ground."

I think Freds been observing me :))
Beware of the Man who shoots with only One gun.

Post Reply

Return to “Minelab Equinox Forum”