How are Horses?

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How are Horses?

Post by stejens »

I've just started my long awaited permission hunt and have several farms I plan to visit. I did message a couple of stables though to start and the first one responded positively :D

However, there seemed to be much worry of how the horses would react, the lady mentioned that it is very rare for any of their fields to be empty of a 4 legged beast galloping around. She was worried that I might get kicked or run over :-SS :-O This of course worries me, as I have never been in a field with horses!
The lady mentioned if that where to happen then they worry about being sued. At this point I mentioned the NCMD insurance cover, which seemed to settle her nerves, and that she would like a copy when I come.
She then proceeded immediately to ask me for a contract about splitting any treasures I find 50/50 (which I had not mentioned yet) h;@

So it all seems very promising, but I think that I am the one who is worrying about the horses even more! =)) I mean I get extremely nervous even if there is a single cow in a field, let alone a pack of galloping iron footed lumps of meat and hair! =))

How do you get on with horses, is it not as bad as I fear? B-)


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Re: How are Horses?

Post by The Digger »

Hi Steve, I have 3 permissions and each one has horses running around. At first they were a bit inquisitive but soon got used to me walking about and sometimes had there noses in the plug I had dug. If you just keep calm and let them sniff around,they will soon get bored and move on.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Oxgirl36 »

My favourite field has 4 horses in it. They keep well away and even polo mints don’t entice them near.

Another field has two friendlier ones. Too friendly sometimes as you can be startled when they stick there nose by your face when you are digging a hole =)) They can stand on your detector or knock it over so you do need to watch that. However no biters or kickers.

Generally I find they are inquisitive animals. Bring some polos or an apple and bribe them if you need to. Generally they get bored of you very quickly and go back to munching the grass.

So get introduced by the owner and be guided by her on the dos and don’ts. Sure you’ll be fine ::g
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bradrick »

Hi Steve

I have two fields with horses and a few of those are ours. They really aren't a problem with a bit of common sense. As OG says above, they are inquisitive (especially if they think you have food, so keep your Garrett Carrot out of view), and definitely be wary of laying your detector on the floor. I don't blame your landowner being careful regarding insurance. Your personal care is important, but whereas the filling of holes is crucial on all fields, it is even more vital with horses in the field. When replacing the 'plugs' of earth, make absolutely sure that you stamp them level and when you visit the field again, check that your holes haven't been re-excavated... foxes, dogs, badgers, squirrels, etc have a habit of doing this. Broken legs and vet bills are very costly and you don't want to be sued.

Cows are a completely different kettle of fish animal. Thick as two short planks and very dodgy/dangerous. Any dogs you may have shouldn't be anywhere near them, they are unpredictable and I've even had the top bitten off one of my fishing rods by a cow.

Good luck.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by geomorphicmat »

Most older horses are fine, but I would be careful around mother and foal combinations as the younger ones are more inquisitive but the mothers are very protective. Just be careful and keep all movements slow and steady around them.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by littleboot »

I don't mind being in a field with horses. intelligent creatures and with some common sense they are easily dealt with. I find calmness and not flapping about is the best policy. Let them come to you, if they want, and don't 'confront' them or face them out. They will soon work out that you are not a threat. They can be inquisitive...I've had a nose in my pockets sometimes...and as OG says its a good idea to make sure they don't stand on your detector!!
So basically Keep calm and Carry on is the motto.
Cows however....despite (or perhaps because of) coming from farming stock I will never detect in a field with cows in it.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Dave8472 »

I detect several places with different types of horses

For the most part they are not a problem, let them say hello and give you a sniff and no sudden movements, don’t creep up behind them though, I talk to them so they can hear me coming.

For the record don’t feed them, it causes them to bug you more and you don’t know their dietary requirements, one place I go people keep giving the horses carrots and she isn’t happy, as one isn’t allowed them etc.

As said above beware young male horses, they can be very full of it, I have detected around baby ones after checking with the mother first :)) ::g

Remove any horse shoes you find as they often have nails hanging out, give them and any other lost bridle finds back to the owner.

PS don’t worry if one runs fast at you, just wave yours arms, it is a horse game :))
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Koala »

horse have a personality

some will come straight over to you and want a stroke. If you ignore them they nudge you until you give them some attention. Detecting can be difficult they decide to always stand in front of you

other are very nervous. I have scared a horse accidentally by opening a can of pop

After awhile they will get use to you and ignore you.

Both horses and cows can be intimidating but rarely give any trouble.

I still have fond memories from a few years ago at Snetterton when a horse and foal snuck up behind me and the foal rubbed up against me for cuddles.

as with cow don't move suddenly and don't get between a mother and there young.

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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bradrick »

Say basically, go for it Steve... there are no neighsayers so far! rl;
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Koala »

even this little fellow get out of the way when you walk towards it. He was blocking the path on the on the Wales coastal path
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Pete E »

Well I am going to be the one who posts a negative on this thread..

Two of my permissions have horses and they are a pain on both..

On one, they have four or five, and one is decidedly unfriendly and will try to knock you down..The field owner warned me about him as the horse will do the same to them from time to time..Another one of the horses will also join in if the mood takes it..

They both need watching, but I simply keep my distance so no big issue.

The other permission is a different story..Again there are a few horses on the field (ponies actually) but one is a small stallion. Again the farmer warned my about the stallion saying it was "wild" and to keep out of which ever field he was in...This was an understatement.

If I went anywhere near the fence, the stallion would race up and down the other side, trying to get at me..It would be snorting and bucking/kicking the whole time..If I got very near the fence, it would repeatedly kick it trying to get me...I have no doubt that horse would seriously injure or even kill anybody in that field and is frankly a ticking time bomb. Luckily its in a fairly out of the way place, but I would hate for a child to wonder in there and have told the farmer that..

So as far as horses in general go I would say take care and listen to what the owner/farmer says..Do not go behind them under any circumstances, and be wary of even "friendly" ones and treat them all with respect..
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by stejens »

Oxgirl36 wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 11:35 am
Bring some polos or an apple and bribe them if you need to.


I remember feeding horses polo's as a kid, still a favourite then : D


Bradrick wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:07 pm
Hi Steve

I have two fields with horses and a few of those are ours. They really aren't a problem with a bit of common sense. As OG says above, they are inquisitive (especially if they think you have food, so keep your Garrett Carrot out of view), and definitely be wary of laying your detector on the floor. I don't blame your landowner being careful regarding insurance. Your personal care is important, but whereas the filling of holes is crucial on all fields, it is even more vital with horses in the field. When replacing the 'plugs' of earth, make absolutely sure that you stamp them level and when you visit the field again, check that your holes haven't been re-excavated... foxes, dogs, badgers, squirrels, etc have a habit of doing this. Broken legs and vet bills are very costly and you don't want to be sued.

Cows are a completely different kettle of fish animal. Thick as two short planks and very dodgy/dangerous. Any dogs you may have shouldn't be anywhere near them, they are unpredictable and I've even had the top bitten off one of my fishing rods by a cow.

Good luck.


I have a friend that I visit sometimes who detects at a stables, but has always stayed clear of any field with horses in, I think he too is cautious or unsure of how they would react. He also mentioned that sometimes his filled plugs would be unplugged when he returned, and always wondered what was causing it, so that is good to know that several animals could be doing it ::g

Good point about the carrot, I'll paint it black and also hide my packed lunch somewhere other than my backpack ;))


littleboot wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 1:03 pm
I don't mind being in a field with horses. intelligent creatures and with some common sense they are easily dealt with. I find calmness and not flapping about is the best policy. Let them come to you, if they want, and don't 'confront' them or face them out. They will soon work out that you are not a threat. They can be inquisitive...I've had a nose in my pockets sometimes...and as OG says its a good idea to make sure they don't stand on your detector!!
So basically Keep calm and Carry on is the motto.
Cows however....despite (or perhaps because of) coming from farming stock I will never detect in a field with cows in it.

Flapping about is something I'll have to train myself not to do, especially when wasps come near me I flap and run, and would probably be the same with a horse while I head tail it to the nearest fence, although the comments so far seem positive so I'll try and be calm B-)

These don't have any cows fortunately, I once went on a dig with a well known group and they allowed any of the 50+ people to detect in the field that held about 20 cows and a couple of young, the cows where going crazy, forming circles around people and sprinting all over the place, they even started charging at some detectorists, it was very scary and intimidating, most ended up staying away from the field from then on. :-O


Dave8472 wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 1:07 pm
I detect several places with different types of horses

For the most part they are not a problem, let them say hello and give you a sniff and no sudden movements, don’t creep up behind them though, I talk to them so they can hear me coming.

For the record don’t feed them, it causes them to bug you more and you don’t know their dietary requirements, one place I go people keep giving the horses carrots and she isn’t happy, as one isn’t allowed them etc.

As said above beware young male horses, they can be very full of it, I have detected around baby ones after checking with the mother first.

Remove any horse shoes you find as they often have nails hanging out, give them and any other lost bridle finds back to the owner.

PS don’t worry if one runs fast at you, just wave yours arms, it is a horse game :))
Dave ):=

I did read about not feeding them due to dietary requirements, was going to check if okay with the owners, but as you say they might bug me more if I do, so will keep the food at bay...or...Maybe just one apple in the bag for an emergency situation where I am cornered by an angry stallion!

No sudden movements, or waving my arms at a charging horse :-O I think if a horse did run fast at me, I would probably run also, and win an Olympic gold medal for the highest hurdle jump =))
Koala wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 1:30 pm
horse have a personality

some will come straight over to you and want a stroke. If you ignore them they nudge you until you give them some attention. Detecting can be difficult they decide to always stand in front of you

other are very nervous. I have scared a horse accidentally by opening a can of pop

After awhile they will get use to you and ignore you.

Both horses and cows can be intimidating but rarely give any trouble.

I still have fond memories from a few years ago at Snetterton when a horse and foal snuck up behind me and the foal rubbed up against me for cuddles.

as with cow don't move suddenly and don't get between a mother and there young.
I suppose it would be hard not to give them attention, I do love horses, and always give them a nose stroke (when on the other side of fence) usually. ;))

As with the beast blocking the path, If I was faced with that, then I would be jumping to the left there, hoping the sea touches the cliff below. :-SS
Bradrick wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 1:51 pm
Say basically, go for it Steve... there are no neighsayers so far!
Haha!


Pete E wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:04 pm
Well I am going to be the one who posts a negative on this thread..

Two of my permissions have horses and they are a pain on both..

On one, they have four or five, and one is decidedly unfriendly and will try to knock you down..The field owner warned me about him as the horse will do the same to them from time to time..Another one of the horses will also join in if the mood takes it..

They both need watching, but I simply keep my distance so no big issue.

The other permission is a different story..Again there are a few horses on the field (ponies actually) but one is a small stallion. Again the farmer warned my about the stallion saying it was "wild" and to keep out of which ever field he was in...This was an understatement.

If I went anywhere near the fence, the stallion would race up and down the other side, trying to get at me..It would be snorting and bucking/kicking the whole time..If I got very near the fence, it would repeatedly kick it trying to get me...I have no doubt that horse would seriously injure or even kill anybody in that field and is frankly a ticking time bomb. Luckily its in a fairly out of the way place, but I would hate for a child to wonder in there and have told the farmer that..

So as far as horses in general go I would say take care and listen to what the owner/farmer says..Do not go behind them under any circumstances, and be wary of even "friendly" ones and treat them all with respect..


That does sound quite worrying, I was calming right down as I read through the thread, now I'm a bag of nerves again : O

Most seem positive so far, I suppose you'll always get the few that are as you describe. I think the owner will show me around, maybe introduce me to the horses and point out any unstable ones, but I will proceed with caution as advised.

Thanks for feedback so far peeps, it is helping to settle me somewhat.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by stejens »

Also, regarding the copy of my NCMD insurance policy that the lady wants me to bring, which document would I need to print? There are a few links on the website but the one that you give to land owners says that the insured is until March 2020, I think that is just a general document as we have insurance lasting beyond that? (depending on membership purchase date) x;

Not sure which to give her.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by beaubrummell »

I believe the NCMD license expires in March each year so the cover mirrors that.

I've had a horse nibbling on my rucksack whilst down retrieving a find but otherwise no problems.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bradrick »

Just another word on plug replacement Steve: the horses themselves have an awful habit of removing these when either chewing at the grass or 'hoofing' disturbed land.

With NCMD: don't forget that your membership isn't renewed automatically and you have to remember to do it yourself to stay covered.

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Re: How are Horses?

Post by TinDigger »

But hang on a second... the NCMD insurance is basically just public liability isn't it? I.e. it protects YOU if someone tries to claim against you for leaving a gate open and all the animals escaping etc. I don't think it reduces the liability on her for any injuries that you sustain as a result of any testosterone fuelled stallions. Have you ever actually been bummed by a horse? It's awful.

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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bors »

The only thing I would watch out for is going in a field with a Stallion put in the field with a Mare to mate. (Like I went in a field with two once). The Stallion took great exception to my presence and decided I was A THREAT. So it galloped up to me snorting and pawing the ground & baring its teeth at me and then decided to perform a few Flying back kicks twirling around aimed at me. That went on for must have been 20 minutes or more but it seemed like an hour. It was a nightmare ,and I only just managed to get out because I waded into a very large pool of water and then scrambled up a wall and out.
What was embarrassing too was ,I had an audience gather whilst it was going on and they clapped as I scrambled over the wall. rl;
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bradrick »

Bors wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 4:49 pm
I only just managed to get out because I waded into a very large pool of water and then scrambled up a wall and out.
What was embarrassing too was ,I had an audience gather whilst it was going on and they clapped as I scrambled over the wall. rl;
Now please tell me there is a video of that somewhere Bors! :D ::g
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by stejens »

Bradrick wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:21 pm
Bors wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 4:49 pm
I only just managed to get out because I waded into a very large pool of water and then scrambled up a wall and out.
What was embarrassing too was ,I had an audience gather whilst it was going on and they clapped as I scrambled over the wall. rl;
Now please tell me there is a video of that somewhere Bors! :D ::g
Haha I was just going to say the same! Would be an instant hit :D =)) Always funny to be the observer, but not so funny to the poor terrified detectorist =))
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Bors »

Nah don`t think so, it was ages ago. I`ll never forget it though. It traumatised me at the time. I thought I was a goner. That Stallion wanted me Toast ! :-L
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by thefiggis »

Nothing to add other than the fact that horses have personalities and while largely good company there are exceptions so ask the landowner what their horses are like and be guided by that.

And the NCMD insurance is a public liability insurance and protect you against claims from the landownwer, not the other way round.
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by stejens »

thefiggis wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:25 pm
Nothing to add other than the fact that horses have personalities and while largely good company there are exceptions so ask the landowner what their horses are like and be guided by that.

And the NCMD insurance is a public liability insurance and protect you against claims from the landownwer, not the other way round.
I see, so what would be the best way to ease her mind of being the one to get sued. Maybe I put on the contract that I proceed under my own risk, so no claims would be made against her, or something like that? x;

And thanks, I shall ask what the horses are like when I meet her. :)
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by thefiggis »

That might do it. Something along the lines of I agree that any activity on the property is entirely at my own risk may be acceptable but to be honest I have no idea how that would hold up in court!
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Re: How are Horses?

Post by Dangerous Norman »

thefiggis wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 7:41 pm
That might do it. Something along the lines of I agree that any activity on the property is entirely at my own risk may be acceptable but to be honest I have no idea how that would hold up in court!
I'm no lawyer or law expert but the way I understand it you can sign an agreement that absolves the landowner of liability provided it is not 'neglect' on their part. So if they warn you that the horses can be unpredictable or machinery can be in use and to avoid being in the area when it is in use you can sign a contract that you personally accept the risk.

I have done that in a sport, classed as dangerous, and while I was there one person broke his neck, two broke their backs and several did limb injuries. None were cause by neglect by the owner & no claim could be made. That applied to a death that occurred a few years after I stopped as the inquiry cleared the centre of any neglect on their part.

I believe that they can't sign away their liability if their allow you access to a barn etc. and a part of the roof falls on you as that would be neglect on their part.

Now don't sue me if that advice is wrong, get it checked first (That's me disclaiming liability, lol)

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