Choosing a Metal Detector Updated 29/8/10

Please only post topics that un-related to any other metal detecting forum here.
Post Reply
User avatar
Blackadder43
Moderator
Posts: 7194
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 1:34 pm
Location: Somerset
Has thanked: 33 times
Been thanked: 28 times

Choosing a Metal Detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by Blackadder43 » Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:09 pm

Hopefully this may help people new to detecting to choose their first detector..

Budget
Probably the most important thing, decide how much money you want to dedicate to this hobby, other factors like mindset and patience will also have some relevance here.

Beach or land or both
Dedicated beach machines are called PI machines (pulse induction)
These machines are excellent at ignoring the heavy mineralisation of the sand and the water and salt contents.
So if you are going to hit the beaches all the time then you need to look for one of these.
For both land and beach there are a few machines that say they can do it, dont take that at face value, phone the dealers up and ask their advise..

Your mindset and levels of patience
What i mean by this is are you easily frustrated?
If so then a top of the range machine with lots of things to tweak is probably not going to be ideal for you.
You would be better with a switch on and go machine.
If you love to tinker and learn then these machines will get your detecting juices flowing and you will do well with this type of machine
A huge reason why people give this hobby up is because the machine they have bought is to complicated and gets the user frustrated.

Notching
I personaly believe this is more designed for the American detectorists, they dig a lot of parks, old houses and tot lots, they dont like to dig ring pulls etc so notching them out is something they do to save time.
Trouble with this is not many(if any) US coinage falls into the pulltab/foil range, over here its a different story.
Hammered coins often fall into this range and notching them out would make you miss them....

Weight
Some machines are very heavy to use or are unbalanced, a machine with a stonking great search coil might look good for your 20 acre field, but swinging it for more than 2 hours may realy take it out of you.
Try if possible to visit a shop and try the machine out, failing that join a club and get a feel for the machines used on a dig.
Failing that ask on the forums, more often than not someone has one or has used one and can advise you.

Unknown makes
This is just my opinion.
On a well known selling site you can often find fantastic sounding machines for £100......I personaly wouldnt buy one of these, and here in my opinion is why:
These machines are mass produced in lets say China, they are built by electronics companys but these companys do not have any detecting experience and therefore rarely have these machines set up to operate correctly.....Sure they will still find stuff, but maybe only a few inches down.....or they are so badly set up that they automaticaly discriminate between some metal items...
Also, if something goes wrong with the machine you have a hellish time trying to contact far away, foreign speaking companys....
Personaly i would stick to dealing with UK companys who sell the big names in detectors...

Research
The net and forums are awash with Field tests and reports on different machines.
Pick a couple of machines in your price range and then narrow down your research to these machines.
Dont be afraid to phone the dealers up and ask them.....also ask them what the best price they can do for you....or maybe what extras they would throw in...

Second hand machines
As with all second hand items its buyers beware.
Buying second hand from a dealer is a good way, they usualy throw in some warranty and can test the machine for you.
Buying from Fleabay.
Ask questions, do they have the reciept, why are they selling.
As for payment on fleabay i would try and draw a cheque from your credit card...I'm not 100% sure but it may give you some comeback should it turn out all wrong.....
Last edited by Blackadder43 on Thu Aug 26, 2010 8:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
When you are right no one remembers; when you are wrong no one forgets

Chopper
Posts: 1371
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2010 6:43 pm
Location: Cheshire

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by Chopper » Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:13 pm

Great thread mate. Perhaps this could be 'stickied' for easy reference.
Minelab Sovereign XS-2A Pro and Garrett Pro Pointer

tim66
Posts: 479
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:21 pm
Location: SOUTH CAMBS

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by tim66 » Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:58 pm

Blackadder43 wrote:
Your mindset and levels of patience.
To put in my tuppenceworth, for what its worth :))

Personally I think this is as important as the machine itself, cause the detector will only ever perform as well as the human behind it.

After watching a selection of different detectorists with various machines on recent digs I'm guessing a new detectorist with good technique and a cheap machine could probably find at least as much, if not more than the impatient deuss swinging "professional" in a head to head :-/
GOLDMAXX AND LADY LUCK!!

User avatar
liamnolan
Moderator
Posts: 9081
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:06 am
Location: Norwich - originally from Dublin, southern Ireland
Has thanked: 141 times
Been thanked: 156 times
Contact:

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by liamnolan » Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:34 am

Great post Bruce and I also agree that this post should be flagged up for easy reference for anyone coming into the world of detecting. It covers so much of the usual questions, well done, Liam
Deus, WSi's - In the end we will regret the chances we didn't take, the relationships we were afraid to have and the decisions we waited too long to make .. Secretary Irish Metal Detecting Society IMDS

martin123
Posts: 59
Joined: Mon Aug 30, 2010 1:22 pm

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by martin123 » Mon Aug 30, 2010 7:30 pm

nice one
CS3MX (well good)

FUBAR
Posts: 5100
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 1:23 pm
Has thanked: 13 times
Been thanked: 17 times

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by FUBAR » Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:31 pm

Hi matey,
This is good sound advice. Well written. :)

trenchdiggabob
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 3:57 pm
Location: stockport, manchester

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by trenchdiggabob » Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:05 am

this post helped me alot and tick all the boxs i needed to know cheers matey :)
sov gt

Rayzor
Posts: 970
Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2011 1:22 pm
Location: Reading Berkshire
Contact:

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by Rayzor » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:04 am

Excellent help here, Its made my mind up.

I started the above mentioned way, bough one of those cheap £40 ones from fleabay, I found myself whacking trees with it 'if in doubt give it a clout' frustration mode with it, The detector eventually had a break down and just constantly screamed when i turned it on, so it found its self ever so gently rammed in the wheelie bin!.

I then spent almost £100 on my next mass produced Hong Kong built POS, That rapidly found its way back to ebay.

Next buy was my Bounty hunter quick draw II. Reconditioned from reputable shop.
When out searching old fields with my uncle, (he also had a quickdraw II) that looked like they had never seen man nor beast for many years, 6 inches down appears a brand new looking redbull can!!!. Night after night, nothing but old bits of metal and rubbish, rusty buckets and paint tins were a common find.
The only finds that I had with it that was good enough to take home were some old pennies and a half crown from our local park, but!!! more frustrating than anything else was the stacks of coins my lady found when we were together, and she has a £27 detector!!!.
After another session of erratic signals, trenches dug and 'detects' vanishing, I decided enough was enough and fired it onto fleabay. (believe me, I spent hours n hours detecting with different settings and discrim modes).

Ive spent the day going through many sites weighing up the pro's n cons of the mid to high range detectors out there and have decided not to break the bank and go for the mentioned 3MX. Im a bit unsure of the 8 x AA baterries weight, but lets hope I find something valueable enough to keep me stocked up on them.

But this time it will be purchased new and with a warranty.

Oh, Im Ray, ladyluck29's unlucky detecting partner. Hi everyone.
XP Deus 9, new11 and 13 inch coils with WS4 and WS5 headphones
http://berkshire-detectorists.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Chairman and founder of Berkshire Metal Detectorists Club

User avatar
Blackadder43
Moderator
Posts: 7194
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 1:34 pm
Location: Somerset
Has thanked: 33 times
Been thanked: 28 times

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by Blackadder43 » Fri Feb 11, 2011 12:11 am

Hello and welcome Rayzor
I am glad you have now found a detector you can settle with.....
Just a thought but you could use rechargeables in your machine....
I purchased 16 Eneloop (use 8 and 8 as back-up) rechargeables for my machine and a charger for £36 delivered, a month ago they became break even, so technicaly i am now in profit as regards buying standard batterys...
Good luck with the machine, any questions then ask away, we have quite a few members using this machine.......
When you are right no one remembers; when you are wrong no one forgets

monkeybaby
Posts: 33
Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 6:44 pm

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by monkeybaby » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:43 am

Detecnics were £220 including delivery and coil cover. Boxed bargains bit, Thats where I got mine, fast next day delivery and nice to deal with.

Rob

jackal
Posts: 86
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 6:28 pm
Location: N wales Flint....

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by jackal » Thu Mar 24, 2011 6:07 pm

This is my dilemma at the moment which machine to opt for, Finacial reasons play a part so you have to begin with what you have.. Then which one for beach and inland i don;t think you could get better than the minelab SOV GT or the older versions if you wanted a machine to cover the two..

There are negative points granted recovery speed on the Sovs is not the best inland and they do "null" out over iron where you could miss a target close to iron..

Or do you opt for recovery speed where top brands XP for example which have a great reputation for recovery speed and are well known machines for working amongst the nails.. It's a difficult one but i think if you target a well known make and machine you will do ok...

I always look for machines on sale alot sometimes you will get one that is more prominent than another and their is a reason why people are selling them, Might be something to bare in mind when you are trying to choose another machine..

Personal preference i try and stick to minelabs or the XP machines..

mark1234
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2011 7:30 pm

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by mark1234 » Sat Aug 20, 2011 10:12 am

i went for a garrett250,works well,bright yellow,see it from miles away,tad heavy,downsides,loves tiny bits of foil.suprised it likes the beach as well,no sound control,use with headphones with volume control,for the price i was shocked at how well it works,just placeing my sun glasses on so i can use it

cport80
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:42 am
Location: Staffordshire

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by cport80 » Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:09 am

tim66 wrote:After watching a selection of different detectorists with various machines on recent digs I'm guessing a new detectorist with good technique and a cheap machine could probably find at least as much, if not more than the impatient deuss swinging "professional" in a head to head :-/
Yes this has recently been proven by mrs Glenfiddich. Part of it may be down to luck as you can only find things if you walk over them and no doubt she had more experience with her machine than we had with the deus. Having a machine suited to the conditions is more likely to bring up finds than just having a top end detector so for stubble fields I would recommend looking for a machine with good accessories available. Either a smaller accessory coil (so you can get down between the stalks) or a larger coil (so you can go over the tops).

P.s. In my defence I was not impatient and I usually do beach & pasture so the stubble was a whole new experience for me on this occasion. I am now carefully rethinking my machine collection though. It would have been better to get it right the first time but you live & learn. At least this topic gets another bump which will be useful to anyone just starting out. :)
Whites Coinmaster | C-Scope CS-1220XD | D2 | Garrett Pro Pointer

Tombs
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2011 4:40 pm
Location: Norwich/wales
Contact:

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by Tombs » Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:51 pm

tim66 wrote:
Blackadder43 wrote:
Your mindset and levels of patience.


After watching a selection of different detectorists with various machines on recent digs I'm guessing a new detectorist with good technique and a cheap machine could probably find at least as much, if not more than the impatient deuss swinging "professional" in a head to head :-/
oww thats going to upset glen lol
E Trac
deus for rainy days
Garrett pin pointer

cport80
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:42 am
Location: Staffordshire

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by cport80 » Sat Oct 22, 2011 11:24 am

Tombs wrote: oww thats going to upset glen lol
I doubt it; it was written well before Glen got his deus. He has 10,000+ acres to go and practice on which are going to be giving up new finds. :D
Whites Coinmaster | C-Scope CS-1220XD | D2 | Garrett Pro Pointer

Frenchie25
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:36 pm
Location: Diss, Norfolk
Has thanked: 5 times

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by Frenchie25 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 5:06 pm

Hi All,

I'm currently using a Garrett ace 250, good machine although I agree with the previous poster it can be a bit anoying that it goes off for every tiny little piece of foil and led. (although this allowed me to find a beutiful little short cross led token the other day about a mile from sibton abbey!
Anyway what I did want to say is that if people do want a very cheap detector to get started, I started off with a £80 logitek machine, although I know I probably missed every single hammered I went over (except one that was actually sticking out of the ground!) I did find loads of larger coppers and a beutiful bronze age axe head because it was totally ignoring the smaller signals you ended up covering more ground therefore finding more finds!
I wouldn't want to go back to it now, but to start out I think it can be quite a good machine to use as you are at least finding quite a few things!
Frenchie25

Current machine, Teknetics T2

Tombs
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2011 4:40 pm
Location: Norwich/wales
Contact:

Re: Choosing a detector

Post by Tombs » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:49 pm

cport80 wrote:
Tombs wrote: oww thats going to upset glen lol
I doubt it; it was written well before Glen got his deus. He has 10,000+ acres to go and practice on which are going to be giving up new finds. :D
hes going to have to move like jhonus to cover that!
should check the date on posts really, im not used to forums
E Trac
deus for rainy days
Garrett pin pointer

Amanda
Posts: 70
Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 8:28 am

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by Amanda » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:29 pm

Blackadder43 wrote:Hopefully this is the right forum to post this in....
Hopefully this may help people new to detecting to choose their first detector..

Budget
Probably the most important thing, decide how much money you want to dedicate to this hobby, other factors like mindset and patience will also have some relevance here.
Beach or land or both
Dedicated beach machines are called PI machines (pulse induction)
These machines are excellent at ignoring the heavy mineralisation of the sand and the water and salt contents.
So if you are going to hit the beaches all the time then you need to look for one of these.
For both land and beach there are a few machines that say they can do it, dont take that at face value, phone the dealers up and ask their advise..
Your mindset and levels of patience
What i mean by this is are you easily frustrated?
If so then a top of the range machine with lots of things to tweak is probably not going to be ideal for you.
You would be better with a switch on and go machine.
If you love to tinker and learn then these machines will get your detecting juices flowing and you will do well with this type of machine
A huge reason why people give this hobby up is because the machine they have bought is to complicated and gets the user frustrated.
Notching
I personaly believe this is more designed for the American detectorists, they dig a lot of parks, old houses and tot lots, they dont like to dig ring pulls etc so notching them out is something they do to save time.
Trouble with this is not many(if any) US coinage falls into the pulltab/foil range, over here its a different story.
Hammered coins often fall into this range and notching them out would make you miss them....
Weight
Some machines are very heavy to use or are unbalanced, a machine with a stonking great search coil might look good for your 20 acre field, but swinging it for more than 2 hours may realy take it out of you.
Try if possible to visit a shop and try the machine out, failing that join a club and get a feel for the machines used on a dig.
Failing that ask on the forums, more often than not someone has one or has used one and can advise you.
Unknown makes
This is just my opinion.
On a well known selling site you can often find fantastic sounding machines for £100......I personaly wouldnt buy one of these, and here in my opinion is why:
These machines are mass produced in lets say China, they are built by electronics companys but these companys do not have any detecting experience and therefore rarely have these machines set up to operate correctly.....Sure they will still find stuff, but maybe only a few inches down.....or they are so badly set up that they automaticaly discriminate between some metal items...
Also, if something goes wrong with the machine you have a hellish time trying to contact far away, foreign speaking companys....
Personaly i would stick to dealing with UK companys who sell the big names in detectors...
Research
The net and forums are awash with Field tests and reports on different machines.
Pick a couple of machines in your price range and then narrow down your research to these machines.
Dont be afraid to phone the dealers up and ask them.....also ask them what the best price they can do for you....or maybe what extras they would throw in...
Second hand machines
As with all second hand items its buyers beware.
Buying second hand from a dealer is a good way, they usualy throw in some warranty and can test the machine for you.
Buying from Fleabay.
Ask questions, do they have the reciept, why are they selling.
As for payment on fleabay i would try and draw a cheque from your credit card...I'm not 100% sure but it may give you some comeback should it turn out all wrong.....

Here is a link to one of our forum members who has kindly made a video about the Cscope 3MX, an ideal machine to start you off with...
viewtopic.php?f=25&t=2746
Thanks Blackadder43 for all the info you put out ther for us new people . I've been using a Spectrum XLT for five days now with no instruction book....loosing the will to live!! I only have the use of this machine for 6 months to get the hang of it before I purchase one of my own ( god help me when that time comes) Any tips for this machine are more than welcome. Thanks again Amanda (new girl)

User avatar
the-roman
Posts: 679
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2012 2:56 pm
Location: Somerset
Has thanked: 4 times
Been thanked: 37 times

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by the-roman » Sat Mar 17, 2012 6:55 pm

a mid range detector will serve you well for many years as most finds normally come out within the first 6". you also need to be lucky enough to go over the lost item. remember too that if it was never lost in the first place then it can never be found...
Only the best, XP Goldmaxx power .... F.I.D member ::g
And a proud member of the best club in Somerset, Wessex Searchers MDC ::g
www.wessexsearchers.club

swoop720
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 6:27 pm
Location: holmfirth
Contact:

Re: Choosing a detector Updated 29/8/10

Post by swoop720 » Thu Jun 14, 2012 10:29 am

my tesoro compadre is a great starter tool and even now after 1 year i can see why experienced detectorsts still use em
tesoro cibola with 12 x 10 coil calibrated in super tune mode

Post Reply

Return to “News & General Chat”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Dave The Slave, littleboot, sozinho, Stillburning and 33 guests